Facts You Probably Don’t Know About Your Eyes

Facts You Probably Don’t Know About Your Eyes

On the face of it, our eyes are just simple orbs in our head, but the fact is that they’re very complex organs. There are seven main parts in the eye that play a role in transmitting information to the brain, detecting light, and focusing. A problem with any of these parts means a problem with your vision.

Our eyes are very complicated and amazing. They seem pretty simple, but there’s really a lot to know about how they function.

You’ve had your peepers since you were born, so you may think you know them pretty well, but here are some facts you may not know about eyes:

  1. The average blink lasts for about 1/10th of a second.
  2. While it takes some time for most parts of your body to warm up to their full potential, your eyes are on their “A game” 24/7.
  3. Eyes heal quickly. With proper care, it only takes about 48 hours for the eye to repair a corneal scratch.
  4. Seeing is such a big part of everyday life that it requires about half of the brain to get involved.
  5. Newborns don’t produce tears. They make crying sounds, but the tears don’t start flowing until they are about 4-13 weeks old.
  6. Around the world, about 39 million people are blind and roughly 6 times that many have some kind of vision impairment.
  7. Doctors have yet to find a way to transplant an eyeball. The optic nerve that connects the eye to the brain is too sensitive to reconstruct successfully.
  8. The cells in your eye come in different shapes. Rod-shaped cells allow you to see shapes, and cone-shaped cells allow you to see color.
  9. You blink about 12 times every minute.
  10. Your eyes are about 1 inch across and weigh about 0.25 ounce.
  11. Some people are born with two differently colored eyes. This condition is heterochromia.
  12. Even if no one in the past few generations of your family had blue or green eyes, these recessive traits can still appear in later generations.
  13. Each of your eyes has a small blind spot in the back of the retina where the optic nerve attaches. You don’t notice the hole in your vision because your eyes work together to fill in each other’s blind spot.
  14. Out of all the muscles in your body, the muscles that control your eyes are the most active.
  15. 80% of vision problems worldwide are avoidable or even curable.

Read the original article published on vsp.com

Who knew your eyes could be so amazing and complex? Make sure to give them the attention they deserve by seeing your eye doctor for a comprehensive eye exam every year.

If it’s been more than a year since your last eye exam, please feel free to drop in to any 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore location or schedule an exam online. 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore is a family owned company that has been serving the Orange City, Melbourne and Winter Park areas for many years.  We look forward to becoming your number one source for all your eye facts and eye care needs.  You can also follow us on Facebook or Twitter to stay up to date on eye trends and eye health.

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Eye Health and Statistics

It’s important to stay up to date on eye health information, especially because some eye conditions like Glaucoma have no symptoms.  As an adult, you might ask yourself, “Why get an eye exam?” Getting an annual eye exam can easily be forgotten, especially with work, family and other obligations.  Make sure you set a reminder in your smartphone or pencil it in to your calendar to get a regular eye exam every year.

Eye Health and Statistic

If it’s been more than a year since your last eye exam, please feel free to drop in to any 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore location or schedule an exam online. We have over 4000 thousand frames to choose from and we’re known for having a frame for every face and a price for any budget. We also have in-house optometrists that are available for full eye examinations.

Visit any of 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore location or call us;

Melbourne
20/20 Eyeglass Superstore
785 N. Wickham Rd. Suite
106 Melbourne, FL 32935
321-259-3935

Orange City
20/20 Eyeglass Superstore
1270 Saxon Blvd,
Orange City, FL. 32763
386-774-5000

Winter Park/Orlando
20/20 Eyeglass Superstore Inc
1555 Semoran Blvd.
Winter Park , FL , 32792
407 767 5600

Color Blindness

ColoR blindness

Color blindness means that you have trouble seeing red, green, or blue or a mix of these colors. It’s rare that a person sees no color at all.

Color blindness is also called a color vision problem.

A color vision problem can change your life. It makes it harder to learn and read, and you may not be able to have certain careers. But children and adults with color vision problems can learn to make up for their problems seeing color.

What causes color blindness?

Most color vision problems are inherited (genetic) and are present at birth.

A color vision problem isn’t always inherited. In some cases, a person can have an acquired color vision problem. This can be caused by:

  • Aging.
  • Eye problems, such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, cataracts, or diabetic retinopathy.
  • Injury to the eye.
  • Side effects of some medicines.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms of color vision problems vary:

  • You may be able to see some colors but not others. For instance, you may not be able to tell the difference between red and green but can see blue and yellow.
  • You may see many colors, so you may not know that you see color differently from others.
  • You may only be able to see a few shades of color, while most people can see thousands of colors.
  • In rare cases, you may see only black, white, and gray.

How is color blindness diagnosed?

Tests measure how well you recognize different colors.

  • In one type of test, you look at sets of colored dots and try to find a pattern in them, such as a letter or number. The patterns you see help your doctor know which colors you have trouble with.
  • In another type of test, you arrange colored chips in order according to how similar the colors are. People with color vision problems cannot arrange the colored chips correctly.

How is it treated?

Inherited color vision problems cannot be treated or corrected.

Some acquired color vision problems can be treated, depending on the cause. For example, if a cataract is causing a problem with color vision, surgery to remove the cataract may restore normal color vision.

You can find ways to help make up for a color vision problem, such as:

  • Wearing colored contact lenses. These may help you see differences between colors. But these lenses don’t provide normal color vision and can distort objects.
  • Wearing glasses that block glare. People with color vision problems can see differences between colors better when there is less glare and brightness.
  • Learning to look for cues like brightness or location, rather than colors. For example, you can learn the order of the three colored lights on a traffic signal.

Read the original article published on webmd.com

When was the last time you and your family members had an eye examination? As May is the vision health month.  Drop in at any 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore location meet with an Independent Optometrist and get additional 10% off on polarized lenses and buy one get one free.

We look forward to assisting you regarding your eyeglasses, contact lenses and sunglasses needs.  Contact us with any questions you may have.

Dry Eyes: Cause and Treatment

Dry Eyes: Cause and Treatment

The eye depends on the flow of tears to provide constant moisture and lubrication to maintain vision and comfort. Tears are a combination of water, for moisture; oils, for lubrication; mucus, for even spreading; and antibodies and special proteins, for resistance to infection. These components are secreted by special glands located around the eye. When there is an imbalance in this tear system, a person may experience dry eyes.

When tears do not adequately lubricate the eye, a person may experience:

  • Pain
  • Light sensitivity
  • A gritty sensation
  • A feeling of a foreign body or sand in the eye
  • Itching
  • Redness
  • Blurring of vision

Sometimes, a person with a dry eye will have excess tears running down the cheeks, which may seem confusing. This happens when the eye isn’t getting enough lubrication. The eye sends a distress signal through the nervous system for more lubrication. In response, the eye is flooded with tears to try to compensate for the underlying dryness. However, these tears are mostly water and do not have the lubricating qualities or the rich composition of normal tears. They will wash debris away, but they will not coat the eye surface properly.

What Causes Dry Eyes?

In addition to an imbalance in the tear-flow system of the eye, dry eyes can be caused by situations that dry out the tear film. This can be due to dry air from air conditioning, heat, or other environmental conditions. Other conditions that may cause dry eyes are:

  • The natural aging process, especially menopause.
  • Side effects of certain drugs such as antihistamines and birth control pills.
  • Diseases that affect the ability to make tears, such as Sjogren’s syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and collagen vascular diseases.
  • Structural problems with the eye lids that don’t allow them to close properly.

How Are Dry Eyes Treated?

Though dry eyes cannot be cured, there are a number of steps that can be taken to treat them. You should discuss treatment options with an eye care specialist. Treatments for dry eyes may include:

  • Artificial tear drops and ointments. The use of artificial teardrops is the primary treatment for dry eye. Artificial teardrops are available over the counter.
  • Temporary punctal occlusion. Plug that can be removed or will dissolve over a few days is inserted into the tear drain of the lower eyelid to determine whether permanent plugs can provide an adequate supply of tears.
  • Permanent punctal occlusion. If temporary plugging of the tear drains works well, then longer-lasting plugs may be used. Many patients find that the plugs improve comfort and reduce the need for artificial tears.
  • Restasis. Eye drop that helps your eyes increase their own tear production with continued use.
  • Other medications. Other medications, including topical steroids, may also be beneficial in some cases.

Read the Original article published on webmd.com.

When was the last time you and your family members had an eye examination? Drop by any 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore location and meet with an Independent Optometrist. Walk-in’s are welcome but we ask that you come at least 20 minutes to your desired appointment time to fill out the required paperwork.  Check out our previous post regarding interesting eye health information for more neat facts about eye care.

We look forward to assisting you regarding your eyeglasses, contact lenses, sunglasses needs and an independent doctor of optometry.  Contact us with any questions you may have.

Eye Pain: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Eye Pain: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Nearly everyone has eye pain or sore eyes at some point in life. Eye pain may be something that resolves on its own. But it also can be a sign of something more serious.

What Causes Eye Pain?

Discomfort or pain can be caused by a problem in the eye or structures around it, including:

  • Cornea: Clear window in the front of the eye that focuses incoming light
  • Sclera: White outside wall of the eye
  • Conjunctiva: Ultrathin covering of the sclera and inside the eyelid
  • Iris: Colored part of the eye, with the pupil in the middle
  • Orbit: Bony cave where the eye and eye muscles are
  • Extraocular muscles: Muscles that rotate the eye
  • Nerves: Carry visual information from the eyes to the brain
  • Eyelids: Outside covering of the eye, which protects and continually spreads moisture over the eyes

Eye problems can include:

  • Blepharitis: Inflammation or infection of the eyelid that causes irritation or pain.
  • Conjunctivitis (commonly called pinkeye): Inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by allergies or infections (viral or bacterial). Blood vessels in the conjunctiva become engorged, and the normally white part of the eye looks red. Other symptoms usually include itchiness and discharge.
  • Corneal abrasions. A scratch on the cornea is called an abrasion. It can be very painful. The cornea is vulnerable to injuries from children’s flying fingers, errant tree branches, or tennis balls. With antibiotic drops and close monitoring by your doctor, corneal abrasions generally resolve completely without future problems.
  • Corneal infections (called keratitis): Inflamed or infected cornea sometimes caused from shingles (herpes zoster) or from wearing contact lenses overnight or without inadequate disinfection.
  • Foreign bodies: Something in the eye — a bit of dirt, plant debris, or a fragment of a contact lens. These are usually just irritating, and tears or water rinse them out. If not removed, foreign bodies can cause corneal abrasions.
  • Glaucoma: Eye condition that usually has no early symptoms. In the case of acute angle closure glaucoma, though, pressure inside the eye rises suddenly. Symptoms include severe eye pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, and decreased vision. These symptoms are an emergency and need immediate treatment to prevent blindness.
  • Optic neuritis: When the nerve traveling from the back of the eyeball into the brain becomes inflamed. Multiple sclerosis or other autoimmune conditions or infections are often the cause. Symptoms include loss of vision and sometimes pain.
  • Stye (also called a hordeolum): An often painful infection or inflammation of the edges of the eyelid caused from the eyelash hair follicles or from oil glands.

What  are Symptoms of Eye Pain?

Eye pain can occur by itself, or there may be various other symptoms present:

  • Decreased vision
  • Discharge, which can be clear, or thick and colored
  • Foreign body sensation — the feeling that something is in the eye, whether or not anything actually is
  • Headache
  • Light sensitivity
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Red eye or pinkeye
  • Tearing
  • The eye being crusted shut after sleep due to discharge

How is Eye Pain diagnosed and Treated ?

Just as the causes of eye pain vary widely, so do the treatments.  Visit an independent doctor of optometry who can diagnose you the cause and treatment of your problem.

  • Conjunctivitis. Antibacterial eye drops can cure bacterial conjunctivitis. Antihistamines — in the form of eye drops, or a pill or syrup — can often improve allergic conjunctivitis.
  • Corneal abrasions. These can be healed but often are treated with antibiotic ointments and close monitoring.
  • Glaucoma. Eye pain is treated urgently with eye drops and occasionally with pills to reduce eye pressure. If these don’t work, surgery may be needed.
  • Infections of the cornea (called keratitis). These may require antiviral or antibacterial eye drops.
  • Optic neuritis. May be treated with intravenous corticosteroids.
  • Sty. Are usually cured by applying regular warm compresses at home for a few days.

Read the original article published on at webmd.com

The only way to sort out the various potential causes of eye pain and to get appropriate treatment is to see a doctor. Your vision is precious protects it by taking eye pain seriously.

Visit us at 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore or Want to schedule an eye exam at 20/20 Eyeglass Superstore? You can schedule an eye exam online here, or call 386-774-5000

What is Cataract?

Cataract- 2020 Eyeglass

A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil.

Cataract is the most common cause of vision loss in people over 40 and is the principal cause of blindness in the world. In fact, there are more cases of cataracts worldwide than there are of glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.

Today, cataracts affect more than 22 million Americans age 40 and older. And as the U.S. population ages, more than 30 million Americans are expected to have cataracts by the year 2020, says Prevent Blindness America.

Cataract Symptoms and Signs

A cataract starts out small and at first has little effect on your vision. You may notice that your vision is blurred a little, like looking through a cloudy piece of glass or viewing an impressionist painting.

Hazy or blurred vision may mean you have a cataract.

A cataract may make light from the sun or a lamp seems too bright or glaring. Or you may notice when you drive at night that the oncoming headlights cause more glare than before. Colors may not appear as bright as they once did.

If you think you have a cataract, visit an eye doctor for an exam to any of our 20/20 eyeglass Superstore.

What Causes Cataracts?

Cataract risk factors include:

  • Ultraviolet radiation from sunlight and other sources
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Prolonged use of corticosteroid medications
  • Statin medicines used to reduce cholesterol
  • Previous eye injury or inflammation
  • Previous eye surgery
  • Hormone replacement therapy
  • Significant alcohol consumption
  • High myopia
  • Family history

Cataract Prevention

High dietary intakes of vitamin E and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin from food and supplements significantly decreased risks of cataract.

Good food sources of vitamin E include sunflower seeds, almonds and spinach. Good sources of lutein and zeaxanthin include spinach, kale and other green, leafy vegetables.

Antioxidant vitamins such as vitamin C and foods containing omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cataract risk.

Visit our Nutrition & Eyes section to read more about eye vitamins and how a healthful diet and good nutrition may help prevent cataracts.

Another step you can take to reduce your risk of cataracts is to wear protective sunglasses that block 100 percent of the sun’s UV rays when you are outdoors.

Read the original article published on allaboutvision.com, written by Gretchyn Bailey.

20/20 Eyeglass Superstore is encouraging all American to do one thing that could save your loved ones sight: Get an eye health examination from a Doctor of Optometry and reduce the risk of cataract.

Call today to book an eye health examination for yourself and your loved ones!